Monday, March 07, 2005

Save your drama for your mama

Apt. #526 March 2, 2005

Since you have added a dog a number of problems have arisen with other tenants wanting dogs. Three other people have tried to do the same. Their logic is un-refutable when viewing your dog. I understand that the precedent was set by the tiny dogs in apartment #108. They got into the building when I took in my ailing 90 year old father - with his toy dog- but my dad was always home. The problem just escalated. #108's tentant is usually home and everyone else who thinks it's their prerogative- is not home or want bigger dogs.
I will have to look up when your lease is expires and do some hard thinking, but I thought that I should warn you about my growing concern. Storied apartment buildings are not the place for working people to keep dogs. What about taking him to a dog sitter out of the building during the day?

***************************************
Her invention of the word, "un-refutable" is a classic. This unsigned, typed note was left in front of our door on Friday night. So far, my response goes something like this:

I'm a little confused as to what this note is supposed to mean. Are you threatening to kick us out or not to renew our lease? How would paying a dog sitter (that we cannot in any way afford) solve your problem here? And how are WE specifically at fault in all this?
I realize that you have quite the dilemma on your hands, but like you said in your note, that was caused when you allowed ANYONE to have dogs in the building.
When we first moved in, Apt. #108 was NOT the only apartment that had a dog. There were two other tenants who also had dogs. (One of the dogs past away and the other tenant has moved out, but you can see how the precedent was set long before we got our dog).
Which brings me to our dog specifically; other than Phil hearing him crying ONE time, we have had no complaints from any of our actual surrounding neighbors (and believe me, we've asked them and some of them are home all day long). Our dog is NOT the dog that is barking or crying all day long. We leave our dog alone for no longer than three hours during the day. The two of us work staggered shifts, so there is also some misconception there that our dog is being left alone for 8 hours a day. That is not the case. You can't tell me that the guy in #108 NEVER leaves his house for more than three hours. We also spot check our dog, meaning we have come home at different times of the day to check on him and walk him. Neither of us have ever come home to a crying dog. We have talked to our vet and trainer and because he is such a small dog (both of his parent breeds are considered toy breeds), neither showed any concern about his living in an apartment. Furthermore, I've worked with animals most of my life and know a great deal about training and health issues, so I really resent being told what is or isn't best for my dog. Because really, this isn't about your concern for my dog, this is about concern for your building (which is understandable).
On that note let me save you the trouble of looking up our lease and just tell you that it is up in October. If you're willing to release us from it and return our deposits as well as give us a good reccommend (since we have been very good renters while we've been here) we would be happy to start looking for a new place to live.
Frankly we haven't really enjoyed living here since certain tenants (a.k.a. your children) have been allowed to run rough shot over the place; with LOUD, all-nighter parties, LOUD arguments with door slamming, LOUD music and LOUD talks about selling and taking drugs.
So, if our dog is your biggest concern, we'd be happy to help you out.

****************************************

Whatta ya think?...too rude?

I should also add that on we ran into her at the grocery store on Saturday and she completely ignored us because she's a passive aggressive douchebag.

2 comments:

Miriam said...

I like your reply... although it seems a bit ridiculous to ask for a good recommend after telling her to shove it. Perhaps, take out the recommendation bit. But yeah... you're absolutely right. She's got NO right to do any of that. Her note sounds like she wrote it so you would be all apologetic and get rid of your dog to save her the trouble of dealing with her own consequences. It's bullshit, and your letter calls her on it.

M

Tracy said...

Very good point!! I also took out the "your children" part...it seemed just a bit too rude to me. I've amended the letter thusly:

I'm a little confused as to what this note is supposed to mean. I thought this was taken care of when we signed our pet release and paid our pet deposit. Are you threatening to kick us out or not to renew our lease? How would paying a dog sitter (that we cannot in any way afford) solve your problem here? And how are WE specifically at fault in all this?
I realize that you have quite the dilemma on your hands, but like you said in your note, that was caused when you allowed ANYONE to have dogs in the building.
When we first moved into the building, Apt. #108 was NOT the only apartment that had a dog. There were two other tenants who also had dogs. (One of the dogs past away and the other tenant has moved out, but you can see how the precedent was set long before we got our dog).
Which brings me to our dog specifically; other than Phil hearing him crying ONE time, we have had no complaints from any of our actual surrounding neighbors (and believe me, we've asked them and some of them are home all day long). Our dog is NOT the dog that is barking or crying all day long. We leave our dog alone for no longer than three hours during the day. The two of us work staggered shifts, so there is also some misconception there that our dog is being left alone for 8 hours a day. That is not the case. You can't tell me that the guy in #108 NEVER leaves his house for more than three hours. We also spot check our dog, meaning we have come home at different times of the day to check on him and walk him. Neither of us has ever come home to a crying dog. We have talked to our vet and trainer and because he is such a small dog (both of his parent breeds are considered toy breeds), neither showed any concern about his living in an apartment. Furthermore, I've worked with animals most of my life and know a great deal about training and health issues. But, let’s be honest, your concern is not for the well being of my animal it is understandably for your building.
On that note let me save you the trouble of looking up our lease and just tell you that it is up in October. If you're willing to release us from it and return our deposits we would be happy to start looking for a new place to live.
Frankly we haven't really enjoyed living here since certain tenants have been allowed to run rough shot over the place; with loud, all-nighter parties, loud arguments with babies crying in the background and door slamming, LOUD music at all hours and loud talks about selling and taking drugs (not to mention the scent of marijuana wafting up through the floor boards and lingering in the main hallway).
But, if having dogs in your building is your biggest concern, there really isn’t much we can do besides offer to leave and attempt to do so on decent terms.